Bike Commuting Boxers


When I first started bike commuting to work, I would dress every morning as a “Spandex Sally.”  When people look like freaks, there’s usually logic behind it.  As it is so with the Spandex Sally look.  Bicycling specific tights have a chamois pad in it.  The chamois (or “shammy”) is roughly the difference of sleeping on a wood floor or sleeping on a mattress.  Shammies are super comfy.  The downside to the tights are that 1) you look like a freak and 2) formunda cheese manufacturing.

Time’s progressed, and now I usually wear my underwear for the day and a pair of Arc Teryx shorts.  The shorts are lightweight.  The fabric, of the shorts, is highly bomb-resistant.  My boxers, on the other hand, are not:

http://adventuresinmissingthepoint.files.wordpress.com/2010/04/1-blowout-1.jpeg?w=403&h=302

Sometimes for short errands, I wear pants.  For this reason, I now look for pants with gusseted crotches:

http://adventuresinmissingthepoint.files.wordpress.com/2010/04/2-blowout-2.jpeg?w=280&h=373

It’s also fun to say gusseted crotches.

When I told others about my idea of repairing my underwear, one reoccurring statement I heard was “Why don’t you just buy new underwear?  It’s not like underwear is expensive!”  I like to think I’m the Bill Bowerman of bicycling underwear.  Even though there are products similar to a gusseted crotch boxer on the market, it’s not quite what I want.

I see it as reducing my consumption as well as preventing future failures.  Buying new underwear will just fail in the same spot.  I borrowed dre’s sewing machine and ripped up the failed jeans.

http://adventuresinmissingthepoint.files.wordpress.com/2010/04/3-patch.jpeg?w=298&h=224

http://adventuresinmissingthepoint.files.wordpress.com/2010/04/4-gtg.jpeg?w=393&h=295

So far I have about 3 miles on “Version 1.”

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2 Responses so far »

  1. 1

    Rooster said,

    Nice work! I borrowed my gf’s sewing machine this winter to make a fleece liner sleeping bag. It can be used for hot summer camping or to double up in the winter.

    The benefits of making your own gear:
    - learn something new (sewing machines have adjustable frequency and amplitude)
    - customize to your needs (efficiency for your body’s characteristics)
    - have unique item (social currency)
    - cheaper (all materials were 20% of what I would’ve paid for a non-custom item)
    *Next goal, making a handlebar bag for my bike. No commercial brands fit my setup.

    I like how you used two “junk” items to make one “better than before” item.

  2. 2

    [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Michael Deming. Michael Deming said: Pete is cool. RT @andreanalyne: pete used my sewing machine yesterday…found out why *shakes head* http://bit.ly/djKXAy [...]


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